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Château La Croix du Casse

Château La Croix du Casse

I was slightly late for a hastily arranged appointment at Château Taillefer, more than a few years ago. Turning off the main road that skirts around the suburbs of Libourne, I headed past Château Plince before taking an early right-turn down a rough and sandy track. I was barely a minute away when I chanced upon, at the side of that sandy track, Château La Croix du Casse. It was a flashback moment for me; the wines of this estate had once provided me with some of my earliest experiences with the wines of Pomerol.

I was not born into wine; I was not taken hunting by my father, fuelled by bottles of vintage Port. I never inherited a cellar stocked with old Bordeaux, nor was I treated to sips of Petrus in my high chair. I learnt about wine through self-funded drinking, and my early wine memories therefore revolve around Chilean Sauvignon Blanc, bargain-basement Chardonnay from South-East Australia and similarly inexpensive delights from Portugal and Eastern Europe, largely plucked from the shelves of a local supermarket or off licence, rather than wading through the French classics.

Château La Croix du Casse

One exception to this rule, however, was Château La Croix du Casse, a wine I did encounter at a time when I would still swoon over words such as Pomerol or Pauillac, the name of the producer a secondary consideration (it did not take long for me to realise I should work the other way around for the best results). I had not seen a bottle for a very long time, and yet here I was, years later, suddenly stumbling over the property and its diminutive cellars, immaculately ploughed soils and its vines, which welcomed me with an autumnal golden-red shimmer.

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