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Bordeaux: Time Out

This is just a quick ‘heads up’ to all Winedoctor subscribers that I doubt I will be able to make any further posts this week, as I am flying out to Bordeaux this evening.

When I visit Bordeaux, such as for the primeurs, it is not unusual for me to suspend site updates, but in their place I usually update the Winedr blog instead, writing less formal posts on what I have been up to, which châteaux I have visited, and what I have tasted that day. I usually steer clear of the primeurs party scene, which gives me the time to do this during the evening, even after a full day of driving and tasting. This next trip is different though; I will be leading a group on a tour of Bordeaux, and the schedule is full of tastings, lunches and dinners (possibly long, drawn-out dinners, who knows?), and I doubt I will have enough time to think, never mind update the site and/or blog as well.

For this reason the site may well be quiet for a few days. If I have time I promise I will post something. In the meantime, here’s my rough schedule for the next few days:

September 30th 2014 – St Emilion: Château Canon-la-Gaffelière and Château Angélus (pictured below).

Château Angélus

October 1st 2014 – Graves and Sauternes: Château Haut-Brion, Château d’Yquem, Château Smith-Haut-Lafitte.

October 2nd 2014 – The Médoc: Château Pontet-Canet, Château Pichon-Baron and Château Rauzan-Segla.

October 3rd 2014 – Bordeaux and Graves: Dinner at Château Haut-Bailly, then back home.

Each visit will be long and relaxed, a luxury compared to my swoop, taste and spit primeur tastings. And some will involve lunch, and I expect to be having dinner at La Tupina and the Brasserie Bordelaise, among other places. As some wine writers might say, it is going to be a mind-blowing trip!

Exploring Sherry #4: Lustau Amontillado del Puerto

I continue my exploration of Sherry with another gem from Lustau now. Lustau was the first Sherry bodega that I really got to know, my very basic knowledge helped along by a Lustau tasting dinner featuring many of their wines, ending in the delightful Old East India Solera Reserva, at the Don Pepe restaurant in Liverpool. That must have been at least a decade ago now.

This wine is another from the excellent Almacenista range.

Lustau Almacenista José Luis González Obregón Amontillado del Puerto

José Luis González Obregón was once a cellar-master for a large bodega, but he decided to retire in order to establish, in 1989, a family bodega. The business then passed into the hands of his nephew, Manuel González Verano. There are a large number of soleras here, but one in particular – the Amontillado del Puerto, a tiny solera of just ten butts – is taken off their hands by Lustau. Tasting it, that seems like a pretty smart decision on Lustau’s part.

The Lustau Almacenista José Luis González Obregón Amontillado del Puerto has a rich hue in the glass, a burnished orange-gold. The nose is remarkable, all dried wood and baked earth at first, the dry and dusty suggestion of baking sun on terracotta pan tiles, then suddenly there are notes of orange oil, mint, and liquorice root too. It is, quite literally, fascinating. There follows a glorious texture to the palate, all vinous and savoury, with a dry and spicy-peppery energy. There is flavour complexity to eclipse the nose here, vanilla brûlée, toasty and rich yet dry and energetic. And in the finish, it is very, very long. This is cracking stuff. 17.5/20 (September 2014)

An Elegant Non-Vintage Pinot Noir Champagne

When I first started learning about wine I found it hardly credible that you could tell which varieties contributed to any particular Champagne. The processes seemed just too complex, the blending and winemaking too large a part of the process, for grape-derived characteristics to be transmitted through from the vineyard to the finished wine. But with time I realised it was true, Pinot Noir bringing a rich substance, an apple-on-biscuit character, Chardonnay bringing purity, orchard fruit and elegance.

Here is a wine that tripped me up though. Elegant, defined, lifted and bright, I never would have though it was almost entirely Pinot Noir.

Brigandat Champagne Brut Tradition NV

Brigandat & Fils are based in Channes, in the Côte des Bars, the southern-most reaches of the Champagne vineyard. To illustrate just how far south this commune lies, it sits right on the boundary between the Aube (north), Yonne (southwest) and Côte d’Or (southeast); Chablis sits just 35 kilometres west, while the vineyards of the Côte d’Or are a little further south. This is really Burgundy country.

The cuvée in question, the Brigandat & Fils Brut Tradition NV, is made from 95% Pinot Noir and 5% Chardonnay, grown on the Kimmeridgian limestone soils that stretch westwards through Chablis and Sancerre. The base vintage is 2010, and the bottling for the second fermentation took place in June 2011. In the glass it has a pale straw hue. The fruit on the nose has a very fresh style, with citrus leaf and suggestion of white orchard fruit, herby-crunchy apple in particular, with a little pear and nut complexity. The palate shows a big, foaming, very youthful mousse set against firm acidity and there is a gentle, softening texture from the dosage. On reflection there is some Pinot substance here after all, with tinges of custard apple and nut, dominating the middle of the palate. A lovely character, youthful though, with an elegant edge for an almost exclusively Pinot-based cuvée. Subtle, poised, yet certain of itself. A good wine. 16/20 (September 2014)

Disclosure: This wine was a sample from Carte du Vin.

Checking in on. . . . Haut Rasne 2002

Spend some time exploring wine and you will notice that, every now and again, it will throw you a curve ball. I think the 2002 Haut Rasné, from Eric Nicolas of Domaine de Bellivière, is a fine example of this.

One of numerous cuvées made by Eric, Haut Rasné is named for the vineyard of origin, which is populated with young vines. The site is particularly prone to botrytis, and so despite their youth Eric tends to vinify the fruit from these vines separately, and he tends to bottle the wine separately too. I last tasted the wine seven years ago, when I noted that it was “fleshy rather than sweet”. I thought it would be interesting to check in on it again.

Domaine de Bellivière Coteaux du Loire Haut Rasné 2002

The 2002 Haut Rasné from Domaine de Bellivière, poured from a 500ml bottle, has a remarkably deep colour, a rich orange-golden hue. And the nose seems no less striking, being richly polished, and there is no doubt in my mind that this is largely due to a healthy dose of botrytis. We have desiccated tropical fruit, perhaps even a touch of white raisin, blanched almonds and apricots too. It feels characterful and broad, confident in its complexity. The palate is everything you might expect, except for one thing; as I noted on my last taste, this is far from overtly sweet on the palate, and indeed the level of residual sugar seems to have faded further, the wine now edging more towards dry than sweet. And yet there is no shortage of deep, vinous texture, and it is not lacking in flavour, the palate very much matching the botrytis-defined nose in this respect. A long, lingering but dry finish. Delicious, quirky stuff indeed. 17.5/20 (August 2014)

This is a real curiosity, but a delightful one. I’m not really a fan of botrytis in dry wines, but this is different, evidently a fading sweet wine rather than a botrytis-tinged bone-dry one, and it has all the breadth and complexity you could hope for. Viewed in this context the wine seems really quite magnificent. Nevertheless this will perhaps be a somewhat awkward wine for those who open a bottle unprepared for this drier style, but anybody who happens to open one alongside a platter of aged cheese, especially aged Comte, could find themselves in Coteaux du Loir, Comte-matching, curve-ball heaven.

Blackberry fruit and svelte tannins; a 2012 Bandol

It is always a joy to cast one’s net in different waters, especially Mediterranean waters. I have long loved the wines of Bandol, so much so that when in Nice four or five years ago I drove over to this, the most famous of all Provence’s appellations, to make some visits. On paper it is a two-hour journey, but it ended up taking three, so I arrived in Bandol just in time to find everywhere closed for lunch, for two hours. And I had to have the hire car back by 6pm that day, meaning I would have to leave at 3pm. It wasn’t the most successful of day trips to wine country.

Happily, this bottle caused no such difficulties.

Château Salettes

The blend is naturally mostly Mourvèdre (about 80% I believe) from the estate’s oldest vines, planted in the 1960s, on a terroir of sandstone and limestone. The wine is aged in large oak foudres for 18-22 months in a 17th-century cellar. In the glass the 2012 Château Salettes Bandol has a dark and glossy hue, the colour of black tulip. It is totally dominated by fruit on the nose, all blackberries with a blueberry edge, and there is some oak here too, sweet and honeyed, with a little chocolate-caramel edge, spiced with black pepper. The palate is textured with creamy fruit, peppery like the nose. Structurally the acidity is low-key, and it benefits from a slightly lower serving temperate, while the tannins are svelte and long. It has great ripeness and dark fruit expression, with a tinge of orange oil. A very primary wine, certainly modern in style, with a ripe coating of tannins in the finish, and with potential. Good. 16/20 (September 2014)

Disclosure: this was a sample received direct from Château Salettes.