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Checking in on. . . . Haut Rasne 2002

Spend some time exploring wine and you will notice that, every now and again, it will throw you a curve ball. I think the 2002 Haut Rasné, from Eric Nicolas of Domaine de Bellivière, is a fine example of this.

One of numerous cuvées made by Eric, Haut Rasné is named for the vineyard of origin, which is populated with young vines. The site is particularly prone to botrytis, and so despite their youth Eric tends to vinify the fruit from these vines separately, and he tends to bottle the wine separately too. I last tasted the wine seven years ago, when I noted that it was “fleshy rather than sweet”. I thought it would be interesting to check in on it again.

Domaine de Bellivière Coteaux du Loire Haut Rasné 2002

The 2002 Haut Rasné from Domaine de Bellivière, poured from a 500ml bottle, has a remarkably deep colour, a rich orange-golden hue. And the nose seems no less striking, being richly polished, and there is no doubt in my mind that this is largely due to a healthy dose of botrytis. We have desiccated tropical fruit, perhaps even a touch of white raisin, blanched almonds and apricots too. It feels characterful and broad, confident in its complexity. The palate is everything you might expect, except for one thing; as I noted on my last taste, this is far from overtly sweet on the palate, and indeed the level of residual sugar seems to have faded further, the wine now edging more towards dry than sweet. And yet there is no shortage of deep, vinous texture, and it is not lacking in flavour, the palate very much matching the botrytis-defined nose in this respect. A long, lingering but dry finish. Delicious, quirky stuff indeed. 17.5/20 (August 2014)

This is a real curiosity, but a delightful one. I’m not really a fan of botrytis in dry wines, but this is different, evidently a fading sweet wine rather than a botrytis-tinged bone-dry one, and it has all the breadth and complexity you could hope for. Viewed in this context the wine seems really quite magnificent. Nevertheless this will perhaps be a somewhat awkward wine for those who open a bottle unprepared for this drier style, but anybody who happens to open one alongside a platter of aged cheese, especially aged Comte, could find themselves in Coteaux du Loir, Comte-matching, curve-ball heaven.

Blackberry fruit and svelte tannins; a 2012 Bandol

It is always a joy to cast one’s net in different waters, especially Mediterranean waters. I have long loved the wines of Bandol, so much so that when in Nice four or five years ago I drove over to this, the most famous of all Provence’s appellations, to make some visits. On paper it is a two-hour journey, but it ended up taking three, so I arrived in Bandol just in time to find everywhere closed for lunch, for two hours. And I had to have the hire car back by 6pm that day, meaning I would have to leave at 3pm. It wasn’t the most successful of day trips to wine country.

Happily, this bottle caused no such difficulties.

Château Salettes

The blend is naturally mostly Mourvèdre (about 80% I believe) from the estate’s oldest vines, planted in the 1960s, on a terroir of sandstone and limestone. The wine is aged in large oak foudres for 18-22 months in a 17th-century cellar. In the glass the 2012 Château Salettes Bandol has a dark and glossy hue, the colour of black tulip. It is totally dominated by fruit on the nose, all blackberries with a blueberry edge, and there is some oak here too, sweet and honeyed, with a little chocolate-caramel edge, spiced with black pepper. The palate is textured with creamy fruit, peppery like the nose. Structurally the acidity is low-key, and it benefits from a slightly lower serving temperate, while the tannins are svelte and long. It has great ripeness and dark fruit expression, with a tinge of orange oil. A very primary wine, certainly modern in style, with a ripe coating of tannins in the finish, and with potential. Good. 16/20 (September 2014)

Disclosure: this was a sample received direct from Château Salettes.