Home > Winedr Blog > Salon des Vins de Loire, Day 1

Salon des Vins de Loire, Day 1

Don’t get me wrong; I think the ‘off’ events that circle around the Salon des Vins de Loire, such as the Renaissance tasting, are great tastings, well worth going to. There are some really excellent wines there, as well as lots of interested, enthusiastic, dedicated growers, and it is fascinating to hear their stories and find out a little about their wines. But for me there is no match for the Salon-proper. This where I get to taste with, for example, Marc Ollivier of Domaine de la Pépière, Claude Papin of Château Pierre-Bise, François Chidaine (actually François was at Renaissance as well, but there are more wines here at the Salon), and the Vacheron family of Domaine Vacheron, with their striking single-vineyard wines. And so it was all go on the tasting front on Monday.

Although I flitted about during the course of the day, everywhere from Muscadet, up through Vouvray and to the Central Vineyards, it was in the latter that I spent most time. And there are plenty of good wines to taste. At some domaines the 2012s are now coming online, with the range of white single-vineyard cuvées from Domaine Vacheron showing particularly well. But the 2013s, where I was able to taste them, are also surprisingly good. The vintage was a difficult one, with rot in the vineyard, although most growers report clean-tasting musts despite this, thanks no doubt to fairly strict selection. Some growers I spoke to jettisoned as much as 50% with rot on certain parcels, although 25-30% was a much more commonly heard figure. In the entire day I picked up overt rot in just one 2013 cuvée, out of dozens tasted; even in this case, all the other wines in the range were as clean as a whistle. But then with rot different parcels are affected in different ways, usually depending on the soil type and whether the rows are enherbé.

Paul-Henry Pellé

I made sure to taste outside the famous appellations of Sancerre and Pouilly-Fumé though, with one obvious port of call being Domaine Henry Pellé, where I tasted with Anne Pellé and her son Paul-Henry Pellé, (pictured above). The wines here have long been good, but there is a really comprehensively successful range of wines here now, and again here they have been able to take advantage of the very favourable 2012 vintage.

Further downriver, there was a very strong range of wines from Marc Olliver and Rémi Branger at Domaine de la Pépière, and that fits in with my other experiences tasting Muscadet before I came out to the Salon. In Touraine, I tasted at several domaines in Vouvray, although the wines on show ranged from 2009 upwards, with few pouring tastes of 2013. One that did was Bernard Fouquet, and these wines showed well; nevertheless the vintage for Vouvray was a disaster for many, in that some growers lost a large chunk of the harvest due to the June hailstorm. François Pinon, for example, who I mentioned in yesterday’s post, turned in just 95 hectolitres – for the entire domaine. To help you visualise that, that is one large stainless steel vat from all his vineyards. But where the fruit escaped the hail, the quality can be good it seems, but the harvests were difficult, late, and carried out under rain-filled skies. Only the most dedicated will make very good wines, and there will be a lot of pétillant wines made in 2013.

To finish off, before I head off for a day of tasting with a focus on Anjou, a quick note on one domaine that I did try to taste at today, Domaine Huet. In fact, as this is perhaps one of the most signficant domaines in the entire Loire Valley, I made a beeline for the Huet stand early on the first day (this has long been my routine when attending the Salon). I was not able to taste the wines, however, and I will describe why and how this situation came about in more detail in another post.

Comments are closed.